Equipment

synchronized temperature and relative humidity sensors
synchronized temperature and relative humidity sensors

Thanks to a loan from the Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, we took seven temperature and relative humidity readings every two minutes for a couple of weeks ahead. The staff at St John’s had to don their safety harnesses to do it, but we even had two hanging from the emergency lights on the highest ceiling.

Our other equipment:

remote temperature sensor
remote temperature sensor
  • 12 infrared remote temperature sensors. They can take the temperature of a surface from up to 12 meters away, in which case they’re measuring over an area of 1 sq m. That means we can even take readings on their ceilings.

 

 

Dimitri demonstrating sling psychrometer
Dimitri demonstrating sling psychrometer
  • a sling psychrometer. If you don’t understand relative humidity yet, you should after you use one!

 

smoke sticks
smoke sticks
  • 4 smoke sticks, for understanding draughts. It’s not real smoke, but they are also used for testing smoke detectors, so we need to be careful to only use them when the smoke detectors are covered.
anemometer
anemometer
  • a hot wire anemometer – which can measure air speeds even at the kinds of low velocity you find in buildings.

Next year, we hope to add more anemometers, and two thermal imaging cameras – one mains powered, and one battery-operated that we can use outdoors. Everyone knows what they do because the pictures make for great publicity, but what do they mean? And when we make a temperature measurement, how accurate is it, and when does that matter?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *